Viewpoint

NAIOP asked some of the Research Foundation’s Distinguished Fellows, the nation’s foremost commercial real estate, economic and public policy experts in academia: How do you cultivate leadership skills in your organization?

David Gockel

David Gockel
President and CEO, Langan

“At Langan, I would describe it as twofold. On the formal side, we offer several off-site leadership training courses to our rising executives over the course of two years. On the informal side, we identify those with the strongest leadership skills and promote them upward through the organization, allowing them to have a positive impact on our growth, our people and our company culture.”


Skip Kalb

Skip Kalb
President, Skip Kalb Strategies, LLC

“Cultivating leadership skills in my experience requires three main elements: 1) Continual training and communication of leadership styles, skills and techniques in line with the organization’s mission and vision; 2) Empowering team members with responsibility based upon this training that provides learning opportunities and builds upon their individual leadership style and skill sets; and 3) Providing constant, timely and honest feedback that reinforces the organization’s desired leadership traits and results.”


Eva Stevens

Eva Stevens
President and COO, United Properties

“We choose to assess talent and skill gaps and are intentionally mentoring and providing experiences to learn. In 2016, we completed an internal leadership/ talent assessment to understand our leadership depth and potential. We are dedicating the time to do this to ensure that we have solid succession planning in place and are intentional about providing opportunities and visibility to the rising talent within the organization. We specifically focused our assessment on leadership skills including thinking and strategy, driving performance, developing talent and relating to others and leadership characteristics including confidence, emotional intelligence, flexibility, self-development focus and credibility. We utilized a third-party consulting psychologist to facilitate the process which gave credibility to the outcomes of the assessments to our employees. From the assessments each employee identified, in collaboration with their supervisor, one or two development goals. This was followed by outlining specific development plans for each goal. Ultimately I believe this has created a culture of mentorship and re-energized learning inside the organization.”